World Soil Day – Dec. 5th

harvesting sweet potatoes in field
Harvesting Sweet Potatoes in Mechanicsville, VA. Lance Cheung, U.S. Department of Agriculture (2013) CC BY 2.0, on Flickr https://flic.kr/p/h4Wf1L

In case you missed it, this past Monday, December 5th, was World Soil Day! Yay!

In this Onion piece, Scientists Make Discovery About World’s Silt Deposits But Understand If You Aren’t Interested In That. Similarly, you might gaze glassy-eyed at my exclamatory proclamation about soils, and move on to celebrity gossip or waffle recipes.

However, here at the Protopian Pickle Jar, I’m offering some reasons for blog-reading, clothes-wearing, oxygen-breathing, food-eating humans to get excited about soils!

Everything We Eat and Everything We Wear!
In TEVA, we taught the kids a chant: “Sun, Soil, Water, Air! Everything we eat and everything we wear!” Then, we challenged them to come up with an item that did not derive its existence from any of those things. (It’s rhyming version of the adage I learned in my undergrad earth science classes, “If it’s not grown, it’s mined.”) No matter what they came up with (plastic dinosaurs, fuzzy socks, water bottles) we were able to trace back its origin to a natural resource.

Every piece of clothing I’m wearing (including dyes, zippers, elastics and snaps)from my cotton underwear to my wool socks to my poly-blend shirt ultimately began with the soil. (Synthetics made from petroleum-based chemicals are mined from oil, which develops from long-dead marine algae, a kind of deposit of ancient solar energy.) Every item of food I eat – fruit, veggies, grains, meat, dairy, mineral supplements- began with the soil.* (Even food that comes from marine ecosystems is still linked to and dependent upon terrestrial soils.)

Ecosystem Services
While I was busy playing with the internet, earth’s soil bacteria are running the planet’s biogeochemical cycles. These soil-dwelling microbes are quietly moving the Earth’s carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur (and other elements!) through the biosphere using a series of metabolic handoffs. The bacteria may just be trying to get some energy (we might say, “Eat!”) by moving a few electrons around. Collectively, these reactions produce the atmosphere we breathe, the greenhouse gases and feedbacks that drive our habitable global climate, and fix the soil nutrients required for plants to photosynthesize.

One example of how microbes affect our environment : During the Biosphere 2 experiment, scientists sealed inside the closed environment faced incredibly low oxygen levels (dropping from ambient 21% to 14%). Barely able to breathe, the scientists could not sustain the daily activity required to continue the project. Biosphere 2 designers did not account for high levels of microbial respiration of the organic material in the Bio2 soils that were pulling oxygen out of the enclosed environment.

The Final Frontier
Not only do we rely on these soil microorganisms for the air we breathe and the food we eat, we don’t know very much about them. From the UN FAO Soil Portal: “Soil biology plays a vital role in determining many soil characteristics, yet, being a relatively new science, much remains unknown about soil biology and about how the nature of soil is affected.” We’re still learning how human activities affect soil microbes, often in unintended ways.

For more information, check out the Soil Science Society of America’s blog Soil Matters, Get the Scoop!

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