Transitionally Nonemployed

nytimes image
I come from a family that communicates via New York Times articles – either emailing articles, calling on the phone to discuss aforementioned articles, in-person rehashing of various articles – you get the idea. Before the advent of internet, Grandma used to clip articles out of the newspaper and send them to you in an envelope via U.S. mail. While reared and educated as Jews, our secondary religious affiliation is probably the “Cult of the New York Times.”

Anyway, Mom called while I was eating lunch to tell me about this NYTimes infographic exploring how a sample of “nonemployed” Americans spend their weekdays.I initially took it personal criticism, “You mean, they don’t just go to Jazzercise and work on their blogs?” But then I actually took a look at the feature and was quite impressed by how the data was displayed. It also got me thinking about how I spend my time as a nonemployed person (a term, I think, that lumps together “officially unemployed” and “stay-at-home parents” and “retired,” among other catergories of people not working outside their homes.)

Since the end of my summer job as a nature educator for a summer camp in August 2014, I have been a nonemployed person engaging in various activities while residing in my parents’ home in the suburbs of Kansas City. Prior to that, I was engaged in various seasonal occupations as Adamah Farm Fellow (Spring 2013), TEVA educator for JCC Day Camps (Summer 2013), TEVA Educator for Shomrei Adamah (Fall 2013), and Isabella Freedman Winter Work Trade (Winter 2014).

So without any actual data, approximately what have I been doing since September?

Month by month, I was:

September:

  • Being Depressed
  • Sleeping (a lot)
  • Traveling with Family
  • Reading Novels
  • Therapy
  • Playing Ukulele

October:

  • Caring for family members
  • Housework
  • Library (checking out/returning/browsing)
  • Goodreads (see in conjunction with “Library”)
  • Coloring (Abstract designs)
  • Crocheting Tea Cozies

November:

  • Facebook
  • Goodreads
  • Library
  • Coloring
  • Joining Jazzercise
  • Career Counseling (Resume review, networking events)

December:

  • Substitute Teaching
  • Facebook
  • Goodreads
  • Library
  • Getting the Flu (seriously sucked)
  • Avoiding Jazzercise

January (so far):

  • Returned most of my library books.
  • Started Protopian Pickle Jar project (includes research on New England utopian enclaves, probiotics, fermentation, and other hippie-related things.)
  • Have gone to one Jazzercise class (which was fun, but kicked my butt)
  • Committed to week of interim childcare for very cute baby.
  • Made no official resolutions.

Other things I did: When I had the flu, I watched pretty much all of the Nature episodes available for streaming on Netflix, then I started watching those available from the PBS site. Hours of baby animal entertainment!

Via Channel Thirteen Website http://www.thirteen.org/13pressroom/press-release/nature-season-32-saving-otter-501/
A Southern Sea Otter mom grooms her pup in Monterey Bay, California. Photo credit: ©Jim Capwell

(Per the NYtimes piece, watching TV was high up on many nonemployed individuals activity logs.) Sometimes I read the library books that I checked out of the library, or stacked them carelessly with multiple renewals, and then returned them to the library unread. I started volunteering with a local non-profit to help out their development department with fundraising and grant projects. I also have been known to take naps, take my dad on grocery shopping trips, and download TED talks and various NPR podcasts.

Just for fun: Benjamin Franklin’s Daily Schedule – Uphill, both ways, in the snow, heck yeah!

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2 thoughts on “Transitionally Nonemployed

  1. A nice, honest blog not concerned with making yourself look fabulous with all your over-the-top accomplishments. I enjoyed how you laced it with tongue-in-cheek humor. Hope you find your dream job that won’t distract you from the life you want to live!

    Liked by 1 person

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